Businesses

Frequently Asked Questions

No. Public Health is contacting all lab-confirmed positive cases of COVID-19 and asking for them to do the following:
  • For people living in the house with a positive case (household contacts), Public Health is asking that the positive case provide this document which asks people living with the positive case to avoid close contact (within 6 feet) of the sick person for 14 days. This may mean asking people in the household to either live away from the infected person for 14 days or if that’s not possible, asking the ill person to stay in a different room with the door closed. The ill person should wear a mask if they have to be within 6 feet of household members. Household members SHOULD BE excluded from work. The only exceptions are healthcare workers and public safety who workers can continue to work as long as they monitor themselves for fever and symptoms daily and stay home if symptoms develop.
  • For people who are close contacts of someone infected with COVID-19, such as co-workers who spent more than 10 minutes face-to-face with the infected employee while they had symptoms, please see the recommendations for close contacts. Public Health is providing this document for the case to be able to provide to close contacts. The recommendation for this group of people is that they should monitor themselves for fever and symptoms daily for 14 days after the last time they were exposed to the ill employee while symptomatic. If any fever or symptoms develop, they need to stay home from work until 72 hours after fever and symptoms resolve.  Exposed individuals who do not have symptoms are allowed to continue working


There is no need to close down your business. Follow routine cleaning procedures



Employees should follow the guidance for exposure to a person with COVID-19.

If employees develop any symptoms consistent with COVID-19, they must:

  1. Cease work activities.
  2. Notify their supervisor or occupational health services prior to leaving work.
  3. Stay home until 72 hours after fever and symptoms of acute infection (not allergies or asthma) are gone, without use of fever-reducing medication. This recommendation applies regardless of whether the individual has been tested for COVID-19 and is advised to reduce overall risk of transmission of flu-like symptoms before returning to work.


If a staff member is sick with new respiratory symptoms that are not related to allergies or a chronic disease such as asthma, they should stay at home until 72 hours after their symptoms have resolved.



A doctor’s note or a negative COVID-19 test should NOT be required to return to work. Public Health is recommending that individuals with mild illness NOT see a doctor; instead, they should stay home and not go back to work until they are free of symptoms for 72 hours. Testing may not be available for individuals with mild illness and Public Health assumes all respiratory illness that is not related to allergies or chronic conditions such as asthma should be treated as if it is COVID-19.



It is important to be aware that COVID-19 is now widespread in our community which means that we are all at risk for getting this virus. If an employee has or may have COVID-19, keep it confidential. This is required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Inform close contacts of the sick employee that they may have been exposed to someone with COVID-19 and provide them with the guidance for close contacts.



If an employee becomes ill at work, they should report to their supervisor and go home. If they are unable to go home immediately, place them in a private room away from others until they are able to return home. Ask them to wear a face mask, if available.



If an employee has a person at home who is sick with respiratory symptoms, the employee should be excluded from work and avoid close contact with the ill person for 14 days. The only exceptions are healthcare workers and public safety workers who can continue to work as long as they monitor themselves for fever and symptoms daily and stay home if symptoms develop.



While Public Health would like to contact all close contacts of an individual who has died from COVID-19, the pace and size of this outbreak will not make this possible. If during the investigation of the death, it is learned that the individual who died was at work with symptoms of COVID-19, Public Health will contact the employer as long as it is still within 14 days of the exposure.



  • Encourage all employees to stay home with fever or respiratory symptoms and provide sick leave for anyone who is ill.
  • Avoid handshakes and hugs
  • Wash your hands and avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth
  • Cover your coughs and sneezes. Throw tissues in the trash.
  • Wipe down your work station daily with a disinfectant wipe.
  • Ensure “high touch” areas like door knobs, elevator buttons, sink faucets, light switches, telephones, etc. in the workplace are cleaned at least daily with routine disinfectants.


  • Public Health has partnered with 2-1-1 so employers and business owners can get answers about their role in preventing and slowing the spread of COVID-19. If you’re an employer or business owner, you can call 2-1-1 and follow the prompts to get to the business line and speak to a representative. It’s open 9am-5pm, Monday through Friday.
  • See the CDC’s interim guidance for business.

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Prepare and Respond to COVID-19 as an Employer

Local Resources:

Federal Resources:

Public Health has partnered with 2-1-1 so employers and business owners can get answers about their role in preventing and slowing the spread of COVID-19. If you’re an employer or business owner, you can call 2-1-1 and follow the prompts to get to the business line and speak to a representative. It’s open 9am-5pm, Monday through Friday.

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Re-opening Guidance & Resources

Federal Guidance Documents

CDC Guidance and Resources

Arizona Executive Orders Pertaining to Re-opening

Retail Establishments and Theaters

Food Establishments

Personal Services, Spas and Salons

Recreational Facilities, Gyms and Pools

Casinos & Gaming

Places of Worship

Industry-specific Guidance Documents

Additional Resources

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Financial Help for Employers

Resources for Small Businesses


Government Directives Impacting Employers

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Employee Assistance

Information Hotlines

Unemployment

Health insurance

Mental Health

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