Schools COVID-19 Dashboard & Guidance

Having trouble viewing the new map? If it's not loading properly in your browser, try clearing your cache in settings.
Quick commands for clearing: Ctrl+F5 for PCs or on Macs cmd + shift + r .

 NEWS for 6/10/21:

  • How were you and your family impacted by COVID-19? Your answers to the brief survey will help inform future funding to support recovery in your community. Take it here
  • Knowing the recommended immunization schedule can help you keep you and your family healthy. Find out what shots you need at every age, including those required by the state for childcare and schools. Need help finding a provider?  Options are available for those with or without insurance.  Learn more
  • Anyone 12 years of age and up is now eligible to be vaccinated against COVID-19. Vaccine is free and is available at some private providers, as well as federally qualified health centers, pharmacies, and state-run PODs. Use our map to search by vaccine type and locations. Find vaccine. Note: Pfizer vaccine is the only vaccine authorized for use in ages 12 and up.  Moderna and J & J vaccines are only authorized for use in people 18 and older. 
  • Maricopa County’s School Dashboard was recently updated to reflect CDC’s community transmission levels of COVID-19 and associated recommended learning modes! Please see the FAQs  for the details about what is different. View full MCDPH K-12 school guidance document. View ADHS school dashboard and guidance here.



THE DASHBOARD


Utilizing the map below, community transmission levels based on CDC-aligned indicators can be viewed by ZIP Code, City, Unified School District, High School District or Elementary District by selecting from the “View report by” drop-down menu. By clicking on your selected area on the map, a pop-up report will generate a value for that area's COVID-19 community transmission level and a link to review the recommended K–12 learning modes. Learn more about using the dashboard.

Note: Individual schools (public, private, or charter) are viewable on the map, but are not a report category. This is because the community transmission level for schools is best evaluated in the context of the communities in which they are located.

Having trouble viewing the new map? 
If it's not loading properly in your browser, try clearing your cache in settings.
Quick commands for clearing: Ctrl+F5 for PCs or on Macs cmd + shift + r .


This dashboard is updated weekly on Thursdays around 9 a.m.
Dashboard last updated: June 10, 2021
Please disable adblockers, if you experience issues viewing the map.

View Map in Full Screen

Report Footnotes


Most recent data for case rates and percent positivity are calculated using area-selected data from 5/30/21-6/5/21.

2 Prior week's data (for reference only — does not impact current community transmission level) for case rates and PCR test percent positivity are calculated using area-selected data from 5/23/21-5/29/21.

View the calendar of dashboard updates and corresponding data time periods.

Additional notes:

  • Geographic regions with smaller populations will have case rates that vary more widely due to the small population denominator.
  • The metrics for areas that cross county lines only include case, test, and population data for Maricopa County residents. These data are representative of the case rate and percent positivity for the portion of the area that is in Maricopa County and are not representative of the case rate and percent positivity for the entire geographic area.

back to top


USING THE DASHBOARD

This dashboard can be used as a guide to help decision-makers better understand the COVID-19 community transmission level around their school and what learning mode might be most appropriate based on the community transmission level. The indicators used to determine community transmission level and learning modes align with CDC’s recommendations in the Operational Strategy for K-12 Schools.

Community transmission levels help us understand what is occurring in a community, however a school’s mitigation plan for how it will work to prevent the spread of COVID-19 among students, staff, and teachers, and the implementation of this plan, are the most important factors for a school’s safe reopening to in-person learning. This mitigation plan will also help the school remain open.

Many schools in Maricopa County have successfully implemented a safe hybrid learning mode with mitigation strategies that include:

  • wearing masks at all times,
  • maintaining physical distancing of 6 feet or more (to the greatest extent possible), and
  • careful surveillance for COVID-19 cases and outbreaks on a school-by-school level.

Per Arizona Executive Order 2021-04, schools that are already open for in-person instruction should continue to operate and strictly implement mitigation strategies. These schools should consult local public health in the event of a school-related outbreak.

back to top


About the Data

To ensure completeness and accuracy of data, case rates and PCR test percent positivity are calculated using area-selected data covering the one-week period ending 5 days prior to day of the dashboard update. Data posted on Thursdays will be reflective of the last full MMWR week (Sunday–Saturday), which is the most recent available data.

Calendar of Dashboard Updates

The dashboard is updated weekly on Thursdays around 9AM. View the table of dashboard updates and corresponding 2-week data calendar ranges.

Find Historical Data for Your Area 

You can view historical community transmission level data by area (city, zip, school district) for case rates and percent positivity dating back to week 5/31-6/6 here.

Covid-like Illness Data

Although COVID-like illness (CLI) data are no longer included in the indicators for determining the level of community transmission of COVID-19, we will continue to provide Maricopa County CLI data for reference here.

CLI data come from a surveillance system that monitors the percent of people who visit emergency rooms and hospitals with symptoms consistent with COVID-19 (syndromic surveillance). The CLI percentage of emergency room and hospital visits are calculated using the most up-to-date surveillance data from the previous two weeks, providing a more “real-time” snapshot of emergency room and inpatient hospitalization activity potentially related to COVID-19.

These data are only available on a county-wide basis.

back to top


COMMUNITY TRANSMISSION INDICATORS & K-12 LEARNING MODES

Each week, the dashboard will show COVID-19 community transmission levels based on indicators calculated using one week of data. A second week of data is provided for historical reference only. Indicators used to calculate community transmission levels, case rate and percent positivity, are based on CDC’s recommendations in the Operational Strategy for K-12 Schools. If the two indicators suggest different levels, the actions corresponding to the higher threshold should be chosen, e.g. if one indicator is orange and one is yellow, actions corresponding to orange (substantial transmission) should be followed.

Thresholds for Community Transmission Opens in new window

Defining the Indicators

Case rate

This is the number of people diagnosed with COVID-19 per 100,000 people in the area selected over the week for which the data is being reported. MCDPH recommends using case rates to evaluate spread of disease in your area because a case rate will more accurately reflect what is happening in your community by accounting for population size.

Percent positivity

This is the percentage of PCR diagnostic tests confirmed positive out of all PCR tests performed in the area selected over the week for which the data is being reported. A higher PCR percent positivity can indicate that there is more disease spreading within the community, or it can mean that there is not enough available testing in the area.

Recommended K-12 Learning Modes by Level of Community Transmission 

COVID-19 Transmission Level Opens in new window

As outlined in MCDPH K-12 school guidance, consistent implementation of 5 key mitigation strategies is recommended for all schools:  

  1. Universal and correct use of masks 
  2. Physical distancing
  3. Handwashing and respiratory etiquette
  4. Cleaning and maintaining healthy facilities
  5. Contact tracing in combination with isolation and quarantine

MCDPH recommends schools offer at least the degree of in-person learning recommended in the K-12 Learning Modes based on the community transmission level for Maricopa County. If the two indicators suggest different levels, the actions corresponding to the higher threshold should be chosen, e.g. if one indicator is orange and one is yellow, actions corresponding to orange (substantial transmission) should be followed. 

Governor Ducey’s Executive Order 2021-4 requires all district and charter schools to offer in-person learning by March 15, 2021 as follows: 

  • Low and Moderate Community Transmission  
    • Elementary, Middle, and High Schools — in-person learning and virtual learning options 
  • Substantial Community Transmission
    • Elementary Schools — in-person learning and virtual learning options 
    • Middle and High Schools — in-person learning and virtual learning options; may reduce attendance 
  • High Community Transmission
    • Elementary Schools — in-person learning and virtual learning options 
    • Middle and High Schools — in-person learning and virtual learning options are required ifthe school has already been open; a school may operate virtually, if in-person learning had not previously resumed 

Many schools in Maricopa County have successfully implemented a safe hybrid learning mode with mitigation strategies that include wearing masks at all times, maintaining physical distancing of 6 feet or more (to the greatest extent possible), and careful surveillance for COVID-19 cases and outbreaks on a school-by-school level. Per Arizona Executive Order 2021-04, schools that are already open for in-person instruction should continue to operate and strictly implement mitigation strategies. These schools should consult local public health in the event of a school-related outbreak. 

Recommendations for When to Consider Returning to Virtual Learning


MCDPH recommends decision-makers view their area data weekly to stay updated on their community transmission levels. Community transmission levels help us understand what is occurring in a community, however a school’s mitigation plan for how it will help prevent the spread of COVID-19 among students, staff, and teachers, and the implementation of this plan, are the most important factors in determining a school’s ability to remain open to in-person learning in higher levels of community transmission.

*For guidance about a school’s learning mode, decision-makers can contact Public Health.

On-Site Services: 


Per Executive Orders 2020-51 and 2020-41, school districts and charter schools are “still obligated to provide on-site learning opportunities and support services,” regardless of the level of COVID-19 community transmission, unless a waiver from ADE has been obtained.

Per Executive Order 2021-4, a school district must continue to offer onsite support services even if a school has closed due to a “significant outbreak” at the recommendation of MCDPH and ADHS.

School Waivers


EO 2020-51 requires schools to provide on-site support services so that students who need a place to go or who have specific needs are well-supported, which allows schools to offer successful distance learning for all students. A waiver is only required and permitted if all on-site services will cease due to an outbreak. Visit the ADE website for more information about the waiver request process.

back to top


Frequently Asked Questions

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released updated guidance for the safe delivery of in-person learning based on the best-available evidence in February 2021. We know that the science and data of COVID-19 continue to evolve, and MCDPH is aligning with the most current data available, the Arizona Department of Health Services and CDC.

This update to the community transmission indicators and recommended K-12 learning mode is also more streamlined. The two indicators that determine a community’s level of COVID-19 transmission are unchanged: COVID-19 case rate per 100,000 over one week and percent of positive PCR tests out of all PCR tests conducted over one week.



Data timeframe:

  • Data posted on Thursdays will be reflective of the last full MMWR week (Sunday–Saturday), which is the most recent available data.
  • The prior dashboard showed data reflective of the full MMWR week (Sunday–Saturday) ending 2 weeks prior.

Indicators of community transmission:

  • COVID-like illness (CLI) will no longer be included as an indicator that determines the community transmission level of COVID-19.
  • Only case rate and percent positivity will be used to determine the community transmission level of COVID-19.
  • Current indicators include the case rate per 100,000 over one week (“case rate”) and percent of positive PCR tests out of all PCR tests conducted over one week (“percent positivity”), which are unchanged from the prior dashboard.

Community transmission level of COVID-19:

  • The community transmission level was previously determined using the case rate, percent positivity and CLI over a consecutive two-week period. In other words, the community transmission level in last week’s data impacted the community transmission level this week.
  • GGoing forward, only the most recent week of data will be used to determine the community transmission level of COVID-19. In other words, last week’s data dashboard update will not impact this week’s community transmission level. School decision-makers have more flexibility in determining the most appropriate learning mode for their school and are able to follow the weekly trends to make any changes to their learning mode.
  • There were previously three levels of community transmission, which has been expanded to four. The indicator thresholds for case rate and percent positivity are unchanged for the low and high levels of community transmission. The previous “moderate” level has been divided into two separate levels, which allows for more nuanced recommendations.

K-12 learning modes:

  • Based on the latest science and data, the updated recommendations allow for more flexibility in determining the most appropriate learning mode for each school or district. The community transmission level of COVID-19 is one factor that impacts the recommended K-12 learning mode. Other important factors include the school’s ability to implement universal mask use, physical distancing of 6 feet or more (to the greatest extent possible), and case investigation/contact tracing in partnership with MCDPH.
  • The updated recommendations also reflect the latest data showing that COVID-19 transmission is less likely to occur in elementary school settings than middle and high school settings. Studies have also shown that elementary school students have more challenges with virtual learning modes. Different recommendations are made for elementary schools compared with middle and high school schools at higher levels of community transmission.


On March 3, 2021, Governor Ducey released Executive Order 2021-4, which announced that all district and charter schools must offer some amount of in-person, teacher-led learning recommended based on the level of community transmission starting no later than the Monday after a scheduled spring break, or by March 15, 2021, if there is no scheduled spring break.

  • The requirement to offer in-person learning is based on the level of community transmission and the grade levels a school serves:
    • Low and Moderate Community Transmission 
    • Elementary, Middle, and High Schools — in-person learning and virtual learning options
  • Substantial Community Transmission 
    • Elementary Schools — in-person learning and virtual learning options 
    • Middle and High Schools — in-person learning and virtual learning options; may reduce attendance
  • High Community Transmission
    • Elementary Schools — in-person learning and virtual learning options 
    • Middle and High Schools — in-person learning and virtual learning options if the school has already been open; a school may operate virtually if in-person learning had not previously resumed
  • The Executive Order also states that all schools with any amount of in-person learning should continue with strict mitigation measures including: universal masking, physical distancing of 6 feet or more (to the greatest extent possible), promoting handwashing and respiratory etiquette, cleaning and maintaining healthy facilities, and continuing to contact trace COVID-19 cases in schools.

  • A district or charter school in Maricopa County may close only if MCDPH and ADHS agree that the school should close due to a COVID-19 outbreak. If this occurs, the school must continue to offer onsite support services during the closure period.

  • All charter and district schools must notify ADE no later than 3/15/21 that they are in compliance with the governor’s Executive Order.


Calculating the level of community transmission of COVID-19 is an important step in determining when a school can reopen to (or continue) in-person learning, because it is one factor that impacts the risk of transmitting COVID-19 in the school setting. Other important factors include the school’s ability to implement: 

  • universal mask use, 
  • physical distancing of 6 feet or more (to the greatest extent possible), 
  • and case investigation/contact tracing in partnership with MCDPH

K-12 learning modes are recommended based on the community’s COVID-19 transmission level. As community transmission decreases, the recommended K-12 learning mode shift to a more in-person environment.



CDC offers a summary of the latest data related to Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in K-12 schools. The summary also includes a list of all data referenced for those looking to read the primary source.



  • The Maricopa County dashboard was created to provide schools and families a user-friendly way to interpret community transmission levels of COVID-19 and to identify which K-12 learning mode might be recommended based on their level of community transmission.

    As of March 11, 2021, both Maricopa County and ADHS dashboards reflect community transmission levels and recommended K-12 learning modes consistent with CDC’s Operational Strategy for K-12 Schools.

    The Arizona Department of Health Services school dashboard provides county-level data about Maricopa County’s community transmission level, which should be used when interpreting Executive Order 2021-4.. Given the physical size of our county and its varied population densities, it’s important for schools to be able to view the level of transmission occurring in the geographic areas they serve. Maricopa County’s dashboard provides data that can be viewed by ZIP code, city, and school district level to give decision-makers multiple options in sorting data that best represent the area in which most students live. Case rate and test percent positivity data are calculated for the geographic area selected (zip code, city, or school district).



PCR percent positivity is the percentage of people who test positive for COVID-19 (by a PCR test) out of all people in the community who have been tested with a PCR test during the same time period. For the purposes of the school dashboard, a “community” is defined by the selected area (ZIP code, city or school district) being viewed on the map. Two separate weeks of data for that area are provided to help provide a directional trend of a community’s overall transmission level.

  • A decreasing percentage of positive tests indicates enough testing is available in the community and that that transmission of the virus is slowing in that area.
  • An increasing percent positivity suggests higher transmission of disease is occurring in the community or that there is less testing available in that area and people with symptoms are more likely to be tested.
  • If people with symptoms are more likely to be tested, there are likely more people with COVID-19 in the community who haven’t been tested. This may mean more cases are going undetected, including those who don’t have symptoms and may be spreading the virus without knowing they’re infected.


If the area selected has a PCR percent positivity noted as “N/A” in a gray box, this means there were fewer than 10 total PCR tests done in that area during the specified week. In these cases, which might change from week to week, the PCR percent positivity metric will not be used in determining the overall community transmission level of COVID-19 in that area.



Governor Ducey’s Executive Order 2021-4 requires all district and charter schools to offer in-person learning by March 15, 2021 as shown on the charts included on dashboard page. See full school guidance here.

Community transmission levels help us understand what is occurring in a community, however a school’s mitigation plan for how it will help prevent the spread of COVID-19 among students, staff, and teachers, and the implementation of this plan, are the most important factors in determining a school’s safe reopening to in-person learning and will help the school remain open.

Strategies schools may consider to reduce the risk of transmission among students and staff are shared in the Arizona Department of Education’s Roadmap for Reopening Schools. These include things such as modifying classroom layouts to promote physical distancing, encouraging behaviors that reduce spread such as hand hygiene and use of masks, and maintaining healthy environments through enhanced cleaning and proper ventilation.

Schools are required to share their mitigation plans on their website prior to offering on-site support services and/or in-person instruction. If schools have questions about their mitigation plans, decision-makers can reach out to Public Health for guidance.

Many schools in Maricopa County have successfully implemented a safe hybrid learning mode with mitigation strategies that include wearing masks at all times, maintaining physical distancing of 6 feet or more (to the greatest extent possible), and careful surveillance for COVID-19 cases and outbreaks on a school-by-school level. Per Arizona Executive Order 2021-04, schools that are already open for in-person instruction should continue to operate and strictly implement these mitigation strategies. These schools should consult local public health in the event of a school-related outbreak.



A hybrid learning mode is a combined instructional approach of having some students partake in in-person learning, while some students engage in virtual learning. This might involve students being on campus on certain days of the week. On other days, they would learn at-home with online components. There are various ways this learning mode can be implemented and will vary based on the unique needs of each school community and the students they serve.

Remember, per Arizona Executive Order 2021-04, the type of learning mode recommended is based on the County’s level of community spread. It is up to school district decision-makers to determine the best way to implement the learning mode to best meet the needs of the students and families they serve. More information about this process can be found in the Arizona Department of Education’s Roadmap for Reopening Schools.



Governor Ducey’s Executive Order 2021-4 requires all district and charter schools to offer in-person learning by March 15, 2021 as shown on the charts included on dashboard page. See full school guidance here

Many schools in Maricopa County have successfully implemented a safe hybrid learning mode with mitigation strategies that include wearing masks at all times, maintaining physical distancing of 6 feet or more (to the greatest extent possible), and careful surveillance for COVID-19 cases and outbreaks on a school-by-school level. Per Arizona Executive Order 2021-04, schools that are already open for in-person instruction should continue to operate and strictly implement these mitigation strategies. These schools should consult local public health in the event of a school-related outbreak. 

Regarding On-Site Services: Per Executive Orders 2020-51 and 2020-41, school districts and charter schools are “still obligated to provide on-site learning opportunities and support services,” regardless of the level of community COVID transmission, unless a waiver from ADE has been obtained. 

To contact Public Health for guidance about when to prepare for a return to virtual learning, school officials can go here. Parents can contact Public Health here



Historic data for community transmission indicators (case rate and percent positivity) are not affected by the update to align with CDC’s indicators and community transmission levels.

You can view historic community transmission data by area (city, zip, school district) for case rates and percent positivity dating back to the week beginning 5/31/20 here. Countywide historical COVID-like illness (CLI) percentage of hospital visits can be found here.


For additional school-related FAQs, click here.

back to top



Planning and Guidance Resources

Additional K-12 school guidance for prevention and mitigation of COVID-19 and reporting outbreaks can be found here.

back to top



Contact Us

Still have questions?

Send us a message.

back to top